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October 28, 2007

Electric scissors don't suck anymore

Back in the days of Home Ec, our high school owned one pair of scuzzy electric scissors that chewed on fabric like a toothless dog.  Not a precision instrument.

F82b224128a066d053ab7010l Black and Decker recently developed heavy-duty cordless Power Scissors for home and garden use.  They're sharp as stink and easily cut through leather, canvas, tarpaulin, cork, cardboard and...smile if you hated Home Ec...fabric.  This is not the wimpy slipshod electric scissor of yore, this is a robust cutter with the heart of a piranha.

You get about an hour of continuous runtime out of the unit before you need to recharge.  You don't need to use any force whatsoever to carve stuff up.  If you have any problems with repetitive strain injuries or arthritis, the comfort grip and powerful little motor will be a huge relief in all your cutting endeavors.

Includes charger and 2-year warranty.   

Retail info:Black & Decker(r) Power Scissors (SZ360)

Now that Black and Decker has nailed the design of Power Scissors I hope they will turn their attention to manufacturing Power Tin Snips.   Because many of us are dramatically separated from a possible future in metalwork when we first try to use tin snips and conclude that nothing is worth that much irritation.   

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